CHS Pics | Kinky Boots in Cal Anderson

Three Dollar Bill was forced to scale back its annual schedule of LGBTQ-favorite outdoor movies in Cal Anderson Park this summer after a longtime source of funding from the city fell through thanks to the most bureaucratic of reasons. You missed it.

CHS stopped through Friday night for the only screening of the season, a showing of Kinky Boots that brought out a good crowd on a 70F+ night. The pictures will have to satiate your Three Dollar Bill Cinema appetite for now. More will come. Three Dollar Bill also produces the annual Seattle Queer Film Festival starting October 10th. Continue reading

With new leader, Capitol Hill LGBTQ film nonprofit raises curtain on 23rd Seattle queer film festival

50 Years of Fabulous, a documentary on the The Imperial Council, screens October 20th

Capitol Hill LGBTQ film nonprofit Three Dollar Bill Cinema is celebrating the kickoff of its 23rd annual Seattle queer film festival with a new leader..

TWIST: Seattle Queer Film Festival 2018

“Three Dollar Bill Cinema is about bringing our community together around queer film and media,” new executive director Ben McCarthy says. “Being able to see ourselves reflected on the screen is really important for our community, and it’s important to come together and see a film in a theater, the way it’s supposed to be seen, rather than on your phone or on your laptop or tablet or even your TV at home.” Continue reading

Filmmaker takes the helm at Capitol Hill’s Northwest Film Forum

(Image: NWFF)

Writer and filmmaker Vivian Hua will take the helm as the executive director of Capitol Hill’s Northwest Film Forum.

After she assumes the role on October 11th, Hua will be in charge of the strategic direction and creative vision of NWFF, a filmmaker’s collective founded in 1995 that uses film to “incite public dialogue and creative action through collective cinematic experiences.”

“There is no more powerful medium than film,” Hua said. “I work at the intersection of using art as a means of social change and discussion.” Continue reading

2018 outdoor movie season begins in Cal Anderson

The smoke has cleared. It’s finally time for a few outdoor movies on Capitol Hill — and nearby.

Friday night brings the 2018 debut of Three Dollar Bill Cinema’s outdoor series in Cal Anderson Park with a screening of Sister Act:

Three Dollar Bill Outdoor Cinema: Sister Act

The Three Dollar Bill screenings begin at sunset — usually around 8:30 PM — in the southeast corner of Cal Anderson:

Arrive early to get a good seat and join us for fun pre-show events. Concessions will be open and music will start at 7:00 pm.  Official announcements will begin at 8:00 pm.

The screenings continue on the 24th and 31st.

There’s also a bonus movie on First Hill to add to your schedule. The First Hill Improvement Association will host a screening of Nine to Five on Friday, September 7th in Freeway Park.

CHS Pics | Era of a new awning at Capitol Hill’s Egyptian theater

While one old Capitol Hill theater has started a new life this summer, another has finally recovered from an indignity that left its historical face scarred for the past few years.

Destroyed by a truck during an October 2016 storm, the Egyptian’s E Pine awning has finally been repaired and upgraded.

The old awning had to be torn down after being ripped apart by a delivery truck on a blustery Seattle day. In the time since, a “SIFF CINEMA / EGYPTIAN THEATER” banner did its best to hide the scar on the Seattle Central-owned property.

The work is part of a busy year for Capitol Hill’s old theaters. In July, the Mexican flag rose above the Harvard Exit where the Consulate of Mexico in Seattle has moved in and now serves hundreds daily.

As for the Egyptian, SIFF updated much of the 1915-built theater after it took over the venue following the exit of Landmark Theaters.

 

 

 

Premiering at SIFF, The Most Dangerous Year documents frontline struggle for trans rights in Washington

Images from The Most Dangerous Year, a documentary that follows a group of Washington State families with transgender kids who joined the fight against the wave of discriminatory anti-transgender legislation

In December of 2015, Vlada Knowlton and her family were adapting to the realities of their five-year-old daughter Annabelle’s transgender identity, and after a difficult period of adjustment things were going great. Then she got a phone call. It was Aidan Key, founder of Gender Diversity, a support group for parents of trans kids that had helped the Knowlton family navigate the often-frightening process of affirming a child’s gender identity. Key had bad news. A new wave of anti-trans legislation was about to hit Washington, and he had a difficult request for Knowlton: Would she be willing to apply her skills as a filmmaker to document the coming struggle?

“I never intended to make a film about transgender people, because for me it was such a personal thing,” Knowlton says, “I’d already gone through that trauma and thought things were gonna get good in our lives again. But it became clear to me after this conversation that I had to use whatever skills I had to start fighting, not only for my own child but for all people like her.”

(Official) Trailer for “The Most Dangerous Year” from Marymoor Productions on Vimeo.

The result is a full-length documentary, The Most Dangerous Year, which chronicles the struggle of people like Knowlton and her family as they fought multiple legislative efforts to deny civil rights to trans people. The film makes its world premiere on Capitol Hill at The Egyptian Theater as part of the Seattle International Film Festival.

Continue reading

Translations, still the largest transgender film fest in the world, returns to Capitol Hill

A scene from They, a story of “the hauntingly beautiful journey of J, a nonbinary youth in the Chicago suburbs”

The world’s largest transgender film festival returns to Capitol Hill this week with 50 films from 15 different countries including Kenya, Japan, Brazil, Ukraine and the Netherlands.

Translations — Seattle Transgender Film Festival

This year’s Translations, the 13th edition of the annual film festival from Three Dollar Bill Cinema, features “a plethora of fun non-film events” including performances and workshops at 12th Ave’s Velocity Dance, an All-Bodies & All Genders Swim at Rainier Beach Pool, a Speed Friending event, a stand-up comedy night, and a return of our How To Be A Trans Ally workshop “for folks who are new to the community.” Continue reading

A Northwest Film Forum without film? Outgoing director looks at future of 12th Ave media and arts ‘hub’

Sheehan (Image: NWFF)

What would Capitol Hill’s Northwest Film Forum be without film?

“It’s one that we discuss all the time,” executive director Courtney Sheehan tells CHS about one of the key questions on the future of the 12th Ave film-focused community center as she prepares to leave the organization she’s helped to grow over the past five years.

Sheehan has given her six months’ notice, she says, to give NWFF time to find a new leader and solidify its new foundation as a community hub that Sheehan has been helping to build since stepping into the director role in 2016.

“We’re really excited that for the first time the forum is really becoming a hub in the center of city,” Sheehan said. Continue reading

After 20 years of LGBTQ film on Capitol Hill, Three Dollar Bill Cinema director seeks new role

Plourde takes in the scene on 15th Ave E (Image: Michelle MacKinnon for CHS)

Executive director Jason Plourde is bidding farewell to Capitol Hill’s Three Dollar Bill Cinema 20 years after his first day as a volunteer usher.

“It’s a little emotional,” he admits. Looking back, Plourde remembers moving to Seattle during a period he describes as “the coming of age of queer filmmaking.”

Three Dollar Bill is a 12th Ave Arts-headquartered nonprofit dedicated to films “by, for, and about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and their families.” The organization is the producer of the annual Twist: Seattle Queer Film Festival, the Translations transgender film fest, and the summertime movie series in Cal Anderson Park. All of these grew and thrived under Plourde’s direction and, hopefully a few times along the way, with him getting a chance to enjoy the show.

The goal of Three Dollar Bill Cinema, board of directors president Joey Burgess says, is “to increase queer visibility, facilitated by arts and film. “Jason has been a wonderful curator of that mission and goal,” he said. Continue reading

Now a teen, Children’s Film Festival Seattle celebrates all-ages cinema on 12th Ave

While we’re talking about a new kid-friendly hangout added to Capitol Hill, let’s talk about one of the neighborhood’s greatest ongoing kid events. The Children’s Film Festival Seattle returns to the Northwest Film Forum later this month. Like most things child-oriented in Seattle, parents need to get on the ball early to make sure their wee ones have spots at the pancake table:

The family-friendly extravaganza celebrates the best and brightest in international cinema that is age-appropriate for ages 2-14, and will include 168 films from 55 nations, spanning the globe from North to South America, Africa, Europe, Asia and the Middle East. The festival includes animation and live-action shorts, features, and hands-on filmmaking workshops, all crafted with care to appeal to a wide range of age groups.

This year’s festival runs January 25th to February 10th with screenings at NWFF’s 12th Ave theater following an opening night party at the Egyptian.

Children’s Film Festival Seattle 2018

“We want children to come to the festival not only to be entertained by funny and fantastic films, but also to discover common ground, to build empathy and envision their places in the wider world,” director Elizabeth Shepherd said in this year’s announcement of the 13th year for the film fest. Continue reading