Design review: Belmont condos, Boylston microhousing

Wednesday night’s session of the East Design Review Board will represent another step in the block by block transformation of Capitol Hill with two projects that will create nearly 100 new homes including new condos on Belmont and new microhousing on Boylston.

301 Belmont Ave E
A new condominium project is coming to this corner just below Broadway replacing a 1908-built fourplex.

301 Belmont Ave E

The plan from a group of investors including OLT Capital and the architects at Wokshop AD calls for a seven-story, 34 condo unit project that will include one unit meeting “the City’s affordable housing incentive criteria” affording the project its extra height and scale under pre-Mandatory Housing Affordability incentives. The developers purchased the property last June for $2 million. Continue reading

Mental health arrest after man reported with bow and arrow on Capitol Hill

A man who caused a bit of a stir Tuesday night as he roamed Capitol Hill with a bow and arrow was taken into custody for evaluation of a possible mental crisis, SPD tells CHS.

911 calls began coming in around 9 PM Tuesday reporting a male carrying a bow and arrow and behaving oddly near north Broadway. Police searched the area but could not locate the man.

Ten minutes later, a caller reported a man shooting an arrow near Boylston and Republican. Police responded to the area and learned the man had entered a nearby building.

Responding officers located the resident inside and took him into custody for mental health evaluation.

Police tell us nobody reported being directly threatened or harmed by the man.

Man charged with rape of unconscious women in Capitol Hill apartment

Redwolf Pope

A Capitol Hill man has been charged with the rape of two unconscious women and detectives are still hoping to identify one of the victims in a case centered on a Boylston Ave apartment where police say they have proof the sexual assaults occurred after two business associates discovered secret cameras, and a stash of incriminating recordings.

“The women who were raped have no memory of the event and were not even aware that they had been raped until they were contacted by Seattle Police in the course of this investigation,” prosecutors write.

Redwolf Pope has been charged with two counts of second degree rape in the assaults at the Boylston-Howell building in the 1700 block of Boylston. Pope maintained a fourth-floor residence in the Capitol Hill Housing building, available only to tenants earning 40% and 50% of area median income, and another in Santa Fe where he faces similar charges for a sexual assault on a Seattle-area woman. Continue reading

Design review: Microhousing on Boylston, apartment tower on First Hill

Wednesday night’s East Design Review Board session includes the big and the small. On First Hill, the board will ponder the early massing plans for a 28-story apartment tower set to replace one of the apparently plentiful surface parking lots around Saint James. Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, a development firm known for its microhousing projects will present its plans for a Boylston Ave E development.

Design review: 420 Boylston Ave E

Developers Johnson & Carr and architects at SHW bring forward a plan for a seven-story building with 58 small efficiency dwelling units to replace a possibly historic but already lined up for demolition early 1900s Boylston Ave E house that has been used as an office building in modern times. The Tucker House stands at 420 Boylston Ave E. Continue reading

Two scary Hilloween stories: The Williamson Sisters and the last day of the CHS subscriber drive

Want to hear something really scary? Without your financial support, CHS as we know it is DOOMED. Halloween is the last day of our push to 800 subscribers. We are far short of the goal but if you would like to continue to enjoy CHS without the DREADED SUBSCRIBER WALL AND HAVING TO LOGIN EVERY TIME, you still have time to SUBSCRIBE and HELP!!!!! us continue providing community news to everybody. Happy Hilloween!

Wanna hear another scary story? Let’s visit 1633 Boylston — today’s Buena Vista apartments. For now, it remains one of the Hill’s oldest apartment buildings. In the winter of 1911, it became the home for two of the more tragic figures in Capitol Hill historythe Williamson Sisters:

While visiting Victoria BC, they read an advertisement for Linda’s book in a Seattle newspaper. Although there was no indication that either of them was sick, they decided to go and take the fasting cure. In February of 1911, they visited Linda at her office and were told that the sanitarium wasn’t ready yet, but that she would treat them in Seattle. The sisters were put up at the Buena Vista Apartments at 1633 Boylston on Capitol Hill.

Under Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard’s, um, care, the sisters were starved from February into April inside the Boylston Ave building, according to Stalking Seattle:

They survived mostly on a thin vegetable broth. Linda would show up regularly to provide the enemas and massages. She also began to make inquiries about the sisters’ business affairs, and offered to store the women’s diamond rings and real estate deeds in her office safe. (How nice)

Dr. Linda’s fasting diet is now a legendarily macabre tale from the annals of quack medicine and a descent into some of the darker corner’s of Capitol Hill’s mortuary past:

Prosecuting attorneys would later suspect that Hazzard had starved the British sisters in order to strip them of their wealth (Claire, weak and skeletal, had signed over her bank accounts to Hazzard shortly before her death.) Worse, the body lying before Conway on the fourth floor of E. R. Butterworth and Sons, beautifully preserved as it was—What was it with these Americans and their obsession with pickling the dead?—was not Claire. At least it didn’t look like Claire. The sisters’ uncle, a Brit and also unaccustomed to embalmed corpses, didn’t recognize his niece either.

Enjoy your Hilloween candy. Oh, and subscribe to CHS… while you still have time.

 

Tipped dumpster truck prompts ‘heavy rescue’ response on Boylston

Witnesses described the incident as a slow motion rollover after a truck loading a construction dumpster near Bellevue and Boylston flipped on its side, trapping the driver in the cab Thursday morning.

They “heavy rescue” response just before 9 AM on a rainy morning on this sloping part of Capitol Hill brought out a full response from Seattle Fire and police as two samaritans first on the scene talked with 911 dispatchers to guide the responders to the tucked away area of northern Capitol Hill.

The driver’s injuries appeared to be not life threatening and he was conscious and talking with the two women who waited with him outside the cab as emergency crews made their way to the scene. He was extricated after Seattle Fire removed the cab’s windshield.

The driver was taken to the hospital following the crash. Seattle Police will investigate the incident. Boylston remained closed until the blocking truck and dumpster could be removed.

Finally giving up on the grass, Tashkent Park celebrated as international symbol of goodwill

(Image: Tim Durkan with permission to CHS)

(Image: Tim Durkan with permission to CHS)

An international symbol of goodwill and a formerly worn down public space connecting some of the most densely populated blocks on the West Coast, Tashkent Park’s makeover was marked with a rededication celebration on Saturday featuring remarks from representatives of Seattle and its sister city, the park’s namesake, Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

The sister city relationship between Tashkent and Seattle was formed in 1973 and was the first Soviet and U.S. sister city agreement in the nation. Of Seattle’s 21 sister cities, Tashkent is one of the few to have a park dedicated to it.

Secretary Abdufarrukh Khavirov of the Uzbekistan Embassy in the U.S., said the park is a piece of his country in Seattle.

“It (is) a symbol of our friendship of our nations,” he said. Continue reading

Demolitions make way for Capitol Hill future, reveal Capitol Hill past

Revealed Remnant of Capitol Hill's Past

Early June became demolition season on Capitol Hill this week as three old buildings came down, raising clouds of musty dust and nostalgia in mostly equal measure. For the two most Capitol Hill memory-filled structures, we had some warning as the wrecking crews came for the old Broadway post office and the longtime 11th Ave home of Hugo House. Fewer knew about the impending doom that awaited the Emerald City Manor apartments on Boylston. But we’re guessing there might be some nostalgia floating in the dust over there, too. Continue reading