How $150K ‘Public Life Study’ could be start of creating a Capitol Hill pedestrian and bike-only superblock

It took two decades of community planning to guide the affordable housing and community space-rich “transit oriented development” set to open above Capitol Hill Station in 2020. Proponents hope a new community-driven plan will play out faster to grow the neighborhood’s Capitol Hill EcoDistrict and — ultimately — create a pedestrian-and cyclist-first “superblock” in the middle of the neighborhood.

The start of this new “Public Life” plan began this summer in Copenhagen and will, officials hope, take a small, $150,000 step forward this fall as the Seattle City Council puts its touches on the city’s next fiscal budget. The discussion will begin Friday in council chambers.

“It’s about focusing on the EcoDistrict to make it more pedestrian friendly and a model for sustainability,” citywide representative Lorena González tells CHS about her proposal to add funding for a “Public Life Study” of Capitol Hill and the longterm hopes for the plan to shape the neighborhood: Continue reading

Citywide rep González part of Capitol Hill EcoDistrict delegation on ‘sustainable, urban strategies’ European field trip

(Image: @cmlgonzalez)

To break the the mayor’s veto of the Seattle City Council’s Sweetened Beverage Tax revenue plan, citywide council member Lorena González had to make an international phone call in the middle of the night to cast her decisive vote Monday afternoon Seattle time.

Turns out, González is abroad this week studying “sustainable, urban strategies” thanks to the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict.

The council member is part of a huge delegation, according to Capitol Hill Housing which started the EcoDistrict effort in 2013 with funding from The Bullitt Foundation to increase sustainability efforts in the neighborhood.  Continue reading

Natural Dyeing Workshop w/ Maggie Pate: Flower-Bundle Steaming

Bundle dyeing is a natural dye technique that involves laying out the dye material on the fiber and rolling it up for a steam bath. Students will create their own silk scarf using food waste items like blueberry extract, onion skins, and turmeric in an original pattern of their choosing.

Textile artist Maggie Pate has cultivated a remarkable studio that is 100% sustainable and eco-friendly. Her main focus is on capturing color predominantly with food waste, collected from local restaurants and farms. In June 2018, she released her first book, The Natural Colors Cookbook. Her guide explores in depth how to capture color with food waste and pantry basics, making natural dyeing and sustainable colors accessible — and earth-loving — to all.

This 2-hour, hands-on workshop will give an overview of how to capture color and create pattern through bundle dyeing.

  1. Intro to Bundle Dyeing
  2. Fiber treatment & preparation
  3. Pattern design and composition
  4. Steam bath technique

During this class, the following item will be provided to practice dyeing:

— Silk scarf

Questions? Can’t make this class date? Email us, and we’ll notify you of our next workshop.

Gift a workshop: Our classes make thoughtful, engaging presents. If you’d like to purchase a workshop for someone, please make a note during checkout.

BYO Indigo Dyeing Workshop w/ Maggie Pate

Breathe new life into stained garments, repurpose old items, or add a beautiful inky-blue indigo color to a new piece. You bring your own natural fiber items, and we’ll provide the indigo and fun.

 

Textile artist Maggie Pate has cultivated a remarkable studio that is 100% sustainable and eco-friendly. Her main focus is on capturing color predominantly with food waste, collected from local restaurants and farms. In June 2018, she released her first book, The Natural Colors Cookbook. Her guide explores in depth how to capture color with food waste and pantry basics, making natural dyeing and sustainable colors accessible — and earth-loving — to all.

Bring up to 5 pre-laundered, manageably-sized fiber items, made of natural fibers (such as linen or cotton).

Questions? Can’t make this class date? Email us, and we’ll notify you of our next workshop.

Gift a workshop: Our classes make thoughtful, engaging presents. If you’d like to purchase a workshop for someone, please make a note during checkout.

Natural Dyeing Workshop w/ Maggie Pate: Flower Pounding

Within each flower, there is an explosive power of color just waiting to be revealed. In this hands-on workshop, we will use a pounding technique and a variety of flowers to create atmospheric and colorful silk scarves. This form of eco-printing has a final result similar to the Japanese technique of shibori dyeing.

Textile artist Maggie Pate has cultivated a remarkable studio that is 100% sustainable and eco-friendly. Her main focus is on capturing color predominantly with food waste, collected from local restaurants and farms. In June 2018, she released her first book, The Natural Colors Cookbook. Her guide explores in depth how to capture color with food waste and pantry basics, making natural dyeing and sustainable colors accessible — and earth-loving — to all.

This 2-hour, hands-on workshop will give an overview of how to create color and pattern from

  1. Intro to Eco-Printing
  2. Fiber treatment & preparation
  3. Flower composition and design
  4. Pounding Techniques

During this class, the following items will be provided to practice dyeing:

— Silk Scarf
— Cotton Tote Bag

If you’re interested in bringing your own fibers to dye, please email us in advance. We’ll try to accommodate all requests. Yarn and protein fibers would work best for this workshop.

Questions? Can’t make this class date? Email us, and we’ll notify you of our next workshop.

Gift a workshop: Our classes make thoughtful, engaging presents. If you’d like to purchase a workshop for someone, please make a note during checkout.

Natural Dyeing Workshop w/ Maggie Pate: Pigment From Petals

We will explore the process of capturing the beauty of a flower and repurpose it into hue. This workshop will open up with an overview lecture on the basics of natural dyeing and then will dive into the extraction process with a hands-on approach with a variety of in-season petals.

Textile artist Maggie Pate has cultivated a remarkable studio that is 100% sustainable and eco-friendly. Her main focus is on capturing color predominantly with food waste, collected from local restaurants and farms. In June 2018, she released her first book, The Natural Colors Cookbook. Her guide explores in depth how to capture color with food waste and pantry basics, making natural dyeing and sustainable colors accessible — and earth-loving — to all.

This 3.5-hour, hands-on workshop will give an overview of how to dye fibers naturally with color extracted from fresh flowers.

  1. Intro to fibers
  2. Scouring and mordant baths
  3. Creating a dye bath
  4. pH shifts

During this class, the following items will be provided to practice dyeing:

— Silk bandana
— Fishnet market tote bag
— Fiber swatches to create a personal dye book

If you’re interested in bringing your own fibers to dye, please email us in advance. We’ll try to accommodate all requests. Yarn and protein fibers would work best for this workshop.

Questions? Can’t make this class date? Email us, and we’ll notify you of our next workshop.

Gift a workshop: Our classes make thoughtful, engaging presents. If you’d like to purchase a workshop for someone, please make a note during checkout.

BYO Indigo Dyeing Workshop w/ Maggie Pate

Breathe new life into stained garments, repurpose old items, or add a beautiful inky-blue indigo color to a new piece. You bring your own natural fiber items, and we’ll provide the indigo and fun.

 

Textile artist Maggie Pate has cultivated a remarkable studio that is 100% sustainable and eco-friendly. Her main focus is on capturing color predominantly with food waste, collected from local restaurants and farms. In June 2018, she released her first book, The Natural Colors Cookbook. Her guide explores in depth how to capture color with food waste and pantry basics, making natural dyeing and sustainable colors accessible — and earth-loving — to all.

Bring up to 5 pre-laundered, manageably-sized fiber items, made of natural fibers (such as linen or cotton).

Questions? Can’t make this class date? Email us, and we’ll notify you of our next workshop.

Gift a workshop: Our classes make thoughtful, engaging presents. If you’d like to purchase a workshop for someone, please make a note during checkout.

Sustainability by the glass as Footprint Wine Tap opens on E Madison

Footprint Wine Tap — “Seattle’s first sustainable keg wine on tap bar” — is now open on Capitol Hill.

CHS first introduced you earlier this year to Seattle wine expert Kenneth Dillon and his plan to overhaul a shuttered E Madison beer tap concept into a new experiment in wine enjoyment and retail.

The sustainability-focused Footprint has set out to feature a wide selection of sustainably sourced, organic, or biodynamic wines from mostly local wineries with pours from kegs available on tap to cut down on waste and, some say, provide a better product. Continue reading

Net-zero energy project will connect to an uprooted house behind Broadway Hill Park

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 4.32.59 PMWe have seen old houses relocated to make space for a new apartment building, but linking the two structures to create a single property may be a first on Capitol Hill. Retrofitting the house and designing the new apartment building to meet some of the strictest environmental standards in the U.S. is definitely a first.

The unique plans for 11th and Republican Passive House Apartments faces another round of design review Wednesday night. The outcome of the meeting also carries a special significance for the neighborhood as the building will serve as the new backdrop to the recently opened Broadway Hill Park.

(Image: CHS)

(Image: CHS)

Continue reading

On Bullitt Center’s first Earth Day birthday, greenest office building on Capitol Hill (and beyond) has more to prove

(Images: Suzi Pratt for CHS)

(Images: Suzi Pratt for CHS)

Powered by the sun -- complete with outdoor ping pong table

Powered by the sun — complete with outdoor ping pong table

It’s hard to believe that Capitol Hill’s Bullitt Center, considered the greenest commercial building in the world, has anything left to prove on sustainability. But a year after the building’s Earth Day opening, the Bullitt Foundation is setting its sights on perhaps the most rigorous green certification in the world.

The International Living Building Institute awards the Living Building certificate to structures that essentially operate as living organisms — one that is sufficient for water and energy and actively promotes the health of its occupants and surrounding environment.

“It just provides a framework for sustainability in the building and shows the world what we’re trying to achieve,” said Bullitt’s Brad Kahn.

The solar-powered, rainwater-capturing Bullitt Center has certainly pushed the boundaries on engineering environmental sustainability, but sustaining tenants is proving to be a bit trickier. The reason the $18.5 million building hasn’t received the Living Building designation yet is because occupancy during its first year has remained below 85% (an important target as the environmental impact of an unoccupied building would be fairly minimal). Continue reading