12th Ave auto shop will make way for apartment and restaurant development

Servicing BMWs, Volvos, and Jaguars on Capitol Hill was good business for the last 46 years or so. Selling the property home to your 12th Ave auto service garage to make way for development of a five-story, 61-unit, mixed-use apartment building planned to feature “sun screens,” a streetfront restaurant, and “a generously planted” courtyard? Probably even better business.

The longtime 12th and E Olive St. fixture Car Tender will be moving out in the next year or so but the design review process for the new building that will replace it begins this week.

On Wednesday, the East Design Review Board will hear about a proposed mixed-use five-story 61-unit apartment planned for the corner of 12th Ave and E Olive St where auto shop Car Tender currently sits.

Design review: 1208 E Olive St

Car Tender owners Russell Kimble and John McDermott declined to comment on the sale and the development. The company claims a pedigree reaching back to the early 1970s. The version of the company owned by Kimble and McDermott was registered with the state in 1999. According to Car Tender’s website, the company has been servicing European cars including BMW, Volkswagen, Volvo, Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar, Land Rover, and others, in the city since 1971. Through various platforms, online reviewers have given the business an average of about four stars for its service. Its candy dish game is also apparently on point. Continue reading

An eviction on 12th Ave leaves woman’s possessions on the street

As soon as her property hit the sidewalk, there were what seemed like crews of junk pickers digging through on the hunt for useful items. By Friday afternoon at 12th and Howell outside the Alyward Apartments, there were still valuables to be had including a rolling suitcase and random electronics. But the futon frame and mattress along with piles of soggy garbage seemed likely to go unclaimed.

The 12th Ave mess was the result of an eviction this week at the Alyward, a person with knowledge of the situation tells CHS. A woman who lived in the building struggled through the eviction notice process and by the point it was time for the King County Sheriff to arrive, the resident was apparently in no shape to deal with her possessions.

A department spokesperson said she was still gathering information on the eviction but, in general, the process requires days of notification so tenants have time to make plans for their property. This timeline from the Tenants Union explains the process and timing.

We are asking the sheriff for more details on this eviction and policies around the removal of property if a tenant is unable to adequately respond to the situation. We are also asking the building’s owner for more information about the situation.

Meanwhile, according to the city’s illegal dumping records, the 12th and Howell location is not yet on the report investigation list. You can see recent reports and status here. Clean-up won’t come quickly. SPU says reports will be “resolved in 10 business days.”

UPDATE 2/13/17 9:33 AM: We’re hoping to learn more from the Sheriff soon but wanted to include information from comments here in the main report. To give you a sense of the timeline in which these processes play out, a complaint filing of unlawful detainer — basically, the legal filing for a landlord to begin eviction proceedings for a tenant who owes rent or is otherwise in violation of a lease — was filed with the court on January 17th. According to the filing, the tenant owed $650 for a unit in the building with a rent of $1,050 a month or $35 per day. The document says the tenant was given a notice to pay rent or vacation on December 22nd. The writ of restitution directing the sheriff to remove the tenant and her possessions was signed by Commissioner Henry Judson on January 27th.

UPDATE 2/15/17 12:45 PM: A spokesperson for the King County Sheriff tells CHS that the detective on this eviction case described the tenant as “coherent and emotionally in control” during the process of removing her property from the apartment:

We served a copy of the notice to the tenant, along with the writ, on 2/1/17. This notice tells them what to expect with regard to their personal property. Our eviction data form asks if the tenants/occupants have any disabilities which was not indicated.

Per the detective that handled the eviction…The property manager did not inform him that there were any disabilities or that the tenant was suffering any mental crisis.

In fact, the tenant was present during the eviction. She was calm and coherent and did not display any unusual emotions or signs of being in mental crisis. The detective spoke to her in length about the eviction process and she responded appropriately.

As her personal property was being placed on the sidewalk area, she calmly collected it and walked it across the street to the nearby Public Storage facility.

“If she had requested storage, or had a physical disability, then her property would have to be stored. If she was incapacitated because of hospitalization or imprisonment, then her property would be stored,” the spokesperson said. “Depending on the severity of any possible mental illness, her property may be stored, as well,” the Sheriff rep writes.

The situation falls under state law RCW 59.18.312 (1):

“If the landlord knows that the tenant is a person with a disability as defined in RCW49.60.040 (as amended by chapter 317, Laws of 2007) and the disability impairs or prevents the tenant or the tenant’s representative from making a written request for storage, it must be presumed that the tenant has requested the storage of the property as provided in this section unless the tenant objects in writing”

Additionally if a tenant is suffering from severe mental crisis, “the detective would have had the King County Mental Health professionals out to evaluate her,” or if necessary, he would have had her involuntarily evaluated at Harborview, the spokesperson said.

Thanks to the King County Sheriff for providing more insight on the situation.

 

Capitol Hill startup Shelf Engine gets $800k seed to grow ‘highly perishable food’ AI

Anybody who has made a Capitol Hill coffee shop their office is probably familiar with neighborhood entrepreneur Stefan Kalb’s work. His Molly’s brand sandwiches and snacks are a ubiquitous part of the Seattle-area cafe scene. Another of his ventures just got a big financial vote of confidence:

Shelf Engine, a Seattle-based startup who uses artificial intelligence to help retailers and distributors order better to optimize for profits in highly perishable food categories, announced today a seed investment of $800k. The investment from Bay Area and Seattle funds is lead by Initialized Capital with participation by Founder’s Co-op, Liquid 2 Venture, and other angel investors enabling Shelf Engine to scale in 2017.

Kalb and co-founder Bede Jordan created Shelf Engine to help reduce waste in the Molly’s business, according to an announcement on the funding round. The startup’s office is on 12th Ave below Plum Bistro and La Spiga in the Piston Ring building.

“Most grocery stores leave ordering of fresh food up to individual category managers. But those managers typically lack appropriate tools and data needed to match orders of hundreds or thousands of products to demand,” CEO Kalb said in the announcement.

Shelf Engine’s order prediction engine analyzes historical order and sales data to generate automated order recommendations, according to the company.

Kalb has stepped down from his CEO role at Molly’s to focus on Shelf Engine, the Seattle Time reports. The news will also create a few new 12th Ave jobs. Much of the financing will go toward hiring developers.

You can learn more at shelfengine.com.

 

Capitol Hill Renter Initiative, Entre Hermanos holding ‘housing justice’ movie night

Last summer, CHS reported on progress in easing the construction of backyard rentals to help combat Seattle’s affordability crisis. The progress has since ground to a halt. Wednesday, the Capitol Hill Renter Initiative and Latino LGBTQ nonprofit Entre Hermanos are teaming up for a movie night and discussion at 12th Ave’s Northwest Film Forum to sort out how the groups “can take action on backyard cottages and other housing justice campaigns” —

Housing Justice Movie Night-Quinceañera

This event was created in response to the recent decision by the Seattle hearing examiner to indefinitely delay an ordinance that would make it easier for homeowners to build backyard cottages (legally called Detached Accessory Dwelling Units or DADUs) like the home the main characters share in the movie. The hearing examiner decision came after a legal challenge by the Queen Anne Community Council, a neighborhood group that hired attorneys in order to delay these low cost housing options from coming to their neighborhood.

You can register for a “ticket” to the event here. The screening is free but organizers are asking for a $3 donation to help cover costs.

CHS wrote here last month on the Capitol Hill Renter Initiative’s goals for 2017.

Mayor calls for ‘second look’ at plan for new King County Youth Justice Center

Maybe taking the protest to Mayor Ed Murray’s North Capitol Hill neighborhood really did make a difference. When it comes to a proposed new youth jail at 12th and Alder, the mayor is now woke:

I have learned that since the passage of the County-wide levy in 2012, a consensus has grown among juvenile justice experts that incarceration is harmful and counterproductive. Incarceration decreases the chances of high school completion, increases risk of recidivism, and is associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes for youth. Due to the racial disproportionately that exists in the youth detention center, these injuries are concentrated in the Black community.

The Stranger broke the news Monday on a letter from Murray to King County officials calling for a “second look” at the controversial 12th Ave project.

“While I recognize that an immediate transition to zero youth incarceration is unrealistic, I have some concerns about the current plans for the detention facility given our joint goals of working toward zero detention,” Murray writes. “The landscape of research on best practices and intervention strategies points to mounting evidence against incarcerating young people that was not known at the time this facility was being planned. This new evidence, the continued decline of incarcerated youth in our community, and the need for considering public concerns all point toward reexamining aspects of this facility.” Continue reading

CHS Pics | Salvage at 14th Ave’s Progressive Missionary Baptist Church

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14th Ave’s Progressive Missionary Baptist Church is a goner but some of the 109-year-old house of worship’s bits and pieces will live on. CHS stopped by the demolition site earlier this month as a crew from Earthwise Architectural Salvage carefully went about preserving some of the old building’s features including its amazing stained glass.

“The age of it is really the crazy thing,” Earthwise’s Aaron Blanchard said. “We’ve done a couple churches but this is the oldest one.” Continue reading

A look inside the 12th Ave juvenile justice center appeal

Earlier this month, activists began a new stand to stop the construction of a new juvenile justice facility and detention center at 12th and Alder. Here is a look inside Ending the Prison Industrial Complex’s appeal with the city’s Hearing Examiner asking for exceptions made in permits issued by the city to be overturned.

“They shouldn’t have gotten the variances,” Knoll Lowney, attorney for EPIC tells CHS.

The new facility is slated to go on the same campus along 12th Ave about a block south of the Seattle University campus. King County has been looking to replace the courthouse and administrative buildings for years. That buildings on the site was constructed in 1951, with an addition in 1972 that also renovated the 1951 building. The recession of 2008 held up plans for the expensive project, but in 2012, the county put a measure up before voters. In addition to the courtrooms and offices, the county included the youth detention facility, which was built in 1992, though EPIC disputes the ballot language was clear about the detention facility being part of the plan. Continue reading

Seattle Seed Company finds new space to grow on 12th Ave

Sander Kallshian became interested in gardening and the environment as a kid.

His family had a garden, and he started an environmentalist club with a neighborhood friend. With some humidifiers and forest wallpaper, he transformed his room into a rainforest.

“I was kind of the environmentalist of the family,” Kallshian told CHS.

That interest has now grown into an online and in store wholesale and retail seed and garden business that recently relocated to the retail space below a new microhousing development at 12th and Yesler. Continue reading

Activists make one last stand against 12th Ave youth jail project

Protest — including a December rally in Mayor Ed Murray’s home North Capitol Hill neighborhood — has not swayed the process, construction permits have been issued for the county’s $210 million project planned to replace the old youth jail still in use at 12th and Alder pending a two-week appeal period. Not surprisingly, an appeal — likely a last ditch effort to stop project — has been filed.

Activists including the Ending The Prison Industrial Complex group leading the fight against the new facility were at the site Wednesday to announce the latest attempt to curb the construction.

“We are united under a vision to create a brighter future for our youth and our region that does not include incarceration of children, but instead invests in community to support, educate and empower our youth,” a statement on the appeal from EPIC and lawyer Knoll Lowney reads: Continue reading

Capitol Hill Community Post | Children’s Film Festival Seattle 2017 at Northwest Film Forum

From the Northwest Film Forum
unnamed-7Northwest Film Forum is getting ready to roll out the red carpet for its 12th edition of Children’s Film Festival Seattle — the largest and most respected film festival of its kind west of the Mississippi.

The festival will stretch out over 12 days, from its opening night on January 26 to its awards ceremony on February 11, 2017, with all screenings at NorthwestFilm Forum, in the bustling heart of Capitol Hill.

The family-friendly extravaganza celebrates the best and brightest in international cinema made for children and young people, and will include 186films from 52 countries, spanning the globe from North to South America, Africa, Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Events will include animation, features, shorts and hands-on filmmaking workshops, all crafted with care to appeal to a wide range of age groups.

The programming is particularly important in this era of social upheaval. Festival director Elizabeth Shepherd says the films in the festival are aimed to empower younger viewers.

“We believe it is more important than ever to champion the ideas of social inclusion, diversity, global awarenes, teamwork, empathy, environmentalism, and human rights, kindness and love, says festival director Elizabeth Shepherd. “We want children to come to the festival not only to be entertained by funny and fantastic films, but also to discover common ground, to build empathy and celebrate our shared humanity.”

OPENING WEEKEND & SPECIAL EVENTS

Festival opening night is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26. This evening’s program will be a celebration of CFFS’s new partnership with the PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival — a joint initiative between the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations and the International Organization for Migration. The New York-based festival showcases films made by young people around the world on the themes of migration, diversity and social inclusion. The opening night program of CFFS will be a special program of prizewinning films from PLURAL+, made by movie makers ages 25 and younger in Canada, Ghana, Lebanon, France, Yemen, Malaysia, Indonesia, Slovenia and the US.

The second Saturday morning of the festival will mark a longtime tradition: an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast at 9:30 a.m.Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption, at 1804 13th Avenue. After the breakfast, at 10:30 and 11 a.m., there will be showings of “Friends are Forever,” a program of live action and animated shorts, at Northwest Film Forum.

Hands-on workshops for kids will roll out both weekends of the festival, with a two-day animation workshop by British animator Charlotte Blacker onJanuary 28 and 29, and a one-day mobile filmmaking (with IPads) workshop taught by Northwest Film Forum education and equipment manager Jonah Kozlowski on February 4.

Seattle animators and filmmakers will also have a portfolio review of their work and learn more about opportunities to create content for Sesame Workshop, at a talk by Sesame Workshop Director of Creative Development, Jordan Geary. Geary’s presentation will take place at 5 p.m. Saturday, January 28, at Northwest Film Forum.

FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS

Festival highlights in 2017 will include several insightful documentaries for families with older children and young teens. “Mussa,” from Israel, tells the poignant story of a young Ethiopian boy who is a refugee in Israel. “Boxing for Freedom,” by Spanish filmmakers Juan Antonio Moreno and Silvia Venegas, tells the uplifting story of a teenaged girl in Afghanistan who is determined to fight for Olympic gold in boxing. “Jeffrey,” from the Dominican Republic, is a hybrid documentary/narrative film that follows a 12-year-old boy, who washes car windows on the streets of Santo Domingo to support his family, all the while dreaming of becoming a reggaeton singing star.

Narrative features include the Seattle premieres of four German films “Heidi,” “At Eye Level,” “Fortune Favors the Brave,” and “Nelly’s Adventures.” The features lineup also includes “My Parrot Mom,” from Argentina, “Mr. Frog,” from The Netherlands, and “Jill and Joy’s Winter,” from Finland. “Molly Monster,” a delightfully animated feature film in English for ages 2 and older, will ensure that all ages can enjoy watching features at CFFS. A new film from Seattle, “The Boy Who Lived Before,” by local filmmaker Stephen Anunson, will also be a part of the festival lineup.

Perhaps most notably, a slew of 17 amazing programs of short animated and live action films will also be included in the festival, with thematic content telegraphed in the program titles, including “No Bullying Allowed,” “Gotta Be Me,” “Save the Earth,” “Friends are Forever,” “Dreaming of a Better World” and “Destination.”

As in previous years, kids will also be important decision-makers and VIPS at the festival — this year’s Children’s Jury, made up of 25 Seattle-area youth ages 9 to 15, will be led once again by a group of seven teenaged jury graduates, and award coveted prizes in numerous categories. Every audience member will also have an opportunity to vote for the festival’s coveted audience awards given in several categories.

School field trip groups, as well as the public, are welcome at the festival. This year, the festival is expanding to not only offer weekday field trip screenings at Northwest Film Forum, but two special screenings at Rainier Arts Center, in the Columbia City neighborhood.

SPECIAL GUESTS

  • Jordan Geary, Director of Creative Development of Sesame Workshop in New York
  • British animator Charlotte Blacker, creator of the festival graphics and trailer, will join us to present a great animation workshop for kids, “Animate the ‘Me’ Machine
  • Dominik Wessely, the director of the German languages feature Nelly’s Adventure
  • Katrin Milhahn, German screenwriter of Fortune Favors the Brave
  • Anthony Orkin, director of the short film Sammy’s Measle
  • Cynthia Pepper, director of the short film Polka Dott
  • Lisa Cohen, Seattle director of the film Confessions of a Former Bully, will be in attendance at both screenings of her film in the “No Bullies Allowed” program
  • Erin Shea, Los Angeles animator, director of the short film Ampersand(in “Save the Earth” program)
  • Peter Marcias, Italian animator, director of the short film My Dog’s Name is Wind (in “Friends Are Forever” program)
  • Daria Kopiec, Polish animator, director of the film Bobo’s Metamorphoses (in “Pure Imagination” program)