Starting on Capitol Hill, The Riveter creating coworking spaces focused on women

When working mothers and friends Amy Nelson and Kim Peltola couldn’t find a workplace the provide support and resources that empowered women and helped them to balance careers and self-care, they decided to create that space.

Their new venture, The Riveter, a coworking, wellness, and community space that focuses on women, but welcomes all will open May 1st on 12th Ave between Pike and Pine. The very real venture will take over an office space that temporarily became the home to a set of reality TV show cast members last summer.

Nelson, a lawyer, and Peltola, a social worker, met about three years ago when both were new mothers. They bonded over the challenges of balancing parenthood, work, and self-care. Continue reading

Seattle Academy’s ‘vertically-oriented middle school’ set to rise above 13th and Union

17202880_1428918773826074_1539814008439652710_nSchools remains a growth industry on Capitol Hill. With a live stream of the building-crunching action of the start of demolition on the school’s Facebook page, Seattle Academy began construction activity Tuesday on its new $48 million Cardinal Union building on E Union just up from 12th Ave.

The Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences, a private school for grades 6-12, will be expanding its presence with what is being touted as the “first vertically-oriented middle school in Seattle.”

The school opened in 1983 and started out in space leased from Temple De Hirsch Sinai. Over the years, they’ve been raising funds to purchase and construct their own buildings. The new five-story building starting this week marks the last big project for the time being, said Doug Ambach, the school’s director of operations.

The school owns most of the block bounded by 12th and 13th avenues and Union and Spring streets, save for a warehouse space along 12th. The construction will largely be taking place along 13th Ave and around the corner onto Union, Ambach said. It will mean pedestrian blockages along those streets. The construction should not impact the school’s 12th Ave face. Plans call for the project to wrap up in time for the start of the 2018 school year. Continue reading

Making case for new justice center, King County says juvenile incarceration down 16%

King County officials sought to shift the narrative surrounding the new juvenile justice center during a March 10 meeting by pointing to a 16% drop in overall juvenile incarcerations and a steeper drop among youth of color.

For the past few months, talk around the center has been about whether or not there should even be a youth jail. A group called Ending the Prison Industrial Complex has filed appeals and staged protests, even going so far as to demonstrate in front of Mayor Ed Murray’s house in opposition to the new facility. The group’s latest gambit, an appeal to the hearing examiner, was recently rejected.

Now, the county is hoping to spread a message of its own. At the recent meeting, leaders in the county’s juvenile justice system laid out progress they say they have made toward the goals for which EPIC is agitating.

Friday’s presentation also made the case that the planned facility has the lowest number of cells possible. Continue reading

The tale of a new home for Postal Plus, an expansion for Ruckus pot shop, and the exit of a Capitol Hill antiquarian book seller

Postal Plus will, indeed, be moving on from its longtime home on Republican at 15th. Because this is Capitol Hill, Seattle in the year 2017, the move involves both a pot shop expansion and changes for an antiquarian book seller.

Let’s start with the mail. Postmaster Ed Zhang has found a new address to help serve as a contractor for the United States Post Office.

“I feel very much relieved,” Zhang said about finding a new location.

Zhang said the new location, which formerly housed Louis Collins Rare Books, is not only more affordable, but it also has space for parking. Zhang said the lease he signed is for 10 years with the option to renew for another 10. After taking the weekend to move and set up, the shop will reopen at 1211 E Denny Way on April 3. Continue reading

How you can help Outer Planet beer brewer’s recovery from heart surgery

Capitol Hill’s tiniest brewery is calling for big support after its brewmaster underwent emergency heart surgery last week. Here is the call from 12th Ave’s Outer Planet to lend your support to James Stoccardo during his recovery: 2b9dea24-675e-45ee-b98c-60a8700cd740_update_profile

Jim has just undergone triple bi-pass open heart surgery. We are trying to raise money to help him with recovery. Below you can read more about the specifics of his health and the surgery itself. Anything will help! He received surgery on March 3rd at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. Dr Glenn Barnhart performed the surgery. He is currently in recovery. Being an artist and small business owner, Jim’s resources are limited and will be strained to the breaking point by this medical emergency. He will need help during his long and painful recovery which will take over 3 months. We are setting up this fundraising campaign to help cover some of his living expenses until he can get back on his feet and start painting and brewing for us all once again.

CHS introduced you to Stoccardo and business partner Renato Martins as they opened the tiny Capitol Hill “nano” brewery in 2015. We checked in last year as Outer Planet celebrated its first year in business. “You start to get to know what you’re doing after 100 batches of beer,” Stoccardo told us back then. Here’s wishing him hundreds of batches more soon.

You can learn more and make a donation here.

Stoccardo in 2015 (Image: CHS)

Stoccardo in 2015 (Image: CHS)

Portland’s Little Big Burger coming to Pike/Pine

If 2016 was the year of the Capitol Hill pizza boom, 2017 might be the year hamburgers broke. Portland export Little Big Burger is expanding to Seattle with a wave of 10 locations — including one being planned for 12th and Pike:

Like their Portland predecessors, Seattle’s Little Big Burgers will be all about truffle fries, tall but slender burgers made with a quarter pound of Cascade Natural beef, cans of beer—and let’s not forget the root beer floats made with Tillamook ice cream.

The chain expects to be open here on the Hill and at a new Green Lake location by spring. Judging by permits for the project on the ground floor of the Beryl Apartments project on the northeast corner of the intersection — there aren’t any yet — that will be a bit of a rush. Continue reading

12th Ave auto shop will make way for apartment and restaurant development

Servicing BMWs, Volvos, and Jaguars on Capitol Hill was good business for the last 46 years or so. Selling the property home to your 12th Ave auto service garage to make way for development of a five-story, 61-unit, mixed-use apartment building planned to feature “sun screens,” a streetfront restaurant, and “a generously planted” courtyard? Probably even better business.

The longtime 12th and E Olive St. fixture Car Tender will be moving out in the next year or so but the design review process for the new building that will replace it begins this week.

On Wednesday, the East Design Review Board will hear about a proposed mixed-use five-story 61-unit apartment planned for the corner of 12th Ave and E Olive St where auto shop Car Tender currently sits.

Design review: 1208 E Olive St

Car Tender owners Russell Kimble and John McDermott declined to comment on the sale and the development. The company claims a pedigree reaching back to the early 1970s. The version of the company owned by Kimble and McDermott was registered with the state in 1999. According to Car Tender’s website, the company has been servicing European cars including BMW, Volkswagen, Volvo, Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar, Land Rover, and others, in the city since 1971. Through various platforms, online reviewers have given the business an average of about four stars for its service. Its candy dish game is also apparently on point. Continue reading

An eviction on 12th Ave leaves woman’s possessions on the street

As soon as her property hit the sidewalk, there were what seemed like crews of junk pickers digging through on the hunt for useful items. By Friday afternoon at 12th and Howell outside the Alyward Apartments, there were still valuables to be had including a rolling suitcase and random electronics. But the futon frame and mattress along with piles of soggy garbage seemed likely to go unclaimed.

The 12th Ave mess was the result of an eviction this week at the Alyward, a person with knowledge of the situation tells CHS. A woman who lived in the building struggled through the eviction notice process and by the point it was time for the King County Sheriff to arrive, the resident was apparently in no shape to deal with her possessions.

A department spokesperson said she was still gathering information on the eviction but, in general, the process requires days of notification so tenants have time to make plans for their property. This timeline from the Tenants Union explains the process and timing.

We are asking the sheriff for more details on this eviction and policies around the removal of property if a tenant is unable to adequately respond to the situation. We are also asking the building’s owner for more information about the situation.

Meanwhile, according to the city’s illegal dumping records, the 12th and Howell location is not yet on the report investigation list. You can see recent reports and status here. Clean-up won’t come quickly. SPU says reports will be “resolved in 10 business days.”

UPDATE 2/13/17 9:33 AM: We’re hoping to learn more from the Sheriff soon but wanted to include information from comments here in the main report. To give you a sense of the timeline in which these processes play out, a complaint filing of unlawful detainer — basically, the legal filing for a landlord to begin eviction proceedings for a tenant who owes rent or is otherwise in violation of a lease — was filed with the court on January 17th. According to the filing, the tenant owed $650 for a unit in the building with a rent of $1,050 a month or $35 per day. The document says the tenant was given a notice to pay rent or vacation on December 22nd. The writ of restitution directing the sheriff to remove the tenant and her possessions was signed by Commissioner Henry Judson on January 27th.

UPDATE 2/15/17 12:45 PM: A spokesperson for the King County Sheriff tells CHS that the detective on this eviction case described the tenant as “coherent and emotionally in control” during the process of removing her property from the apartment:

We served a copy of the notice to the tenant, along with the writ, on 2/1/17. This notice tells them what to expect with regard to their personal property. Our eviction data form asks if the tenants/occupants have any disabilities which was not indicated.

Per the detective that handled the eviction…The property manager did not inform him that there were any disabilities or that the tenant was suffering any mental crisis.

In fact, the tenant was present during the eviction. She was calm and coherent and did not display any unusual emotions or signs of being in mental crisis. The detective spoke to her in length about the eviction process and she responded appropriately.

As her personal property was being placed on the sidewalk area, she calmly collected it and walked it across the street to the nearby Public Storage facility.

“If she had requested storage, or had a physical disability, then her property would have to be stored. If she was incapacitated because of hospitalization or imprisonment, then her property would be stored,” the spokesperson said. “Depending on the severity of any possible mental illness, her property may be stored, as well,” the Sheriff rep writes.

The situation falls under state law RCW 59.18.312 (1):

“If the landlord knows that the tenant is a person with a disability as defined in RCW49.60.040 (as amended by chapter 317, Laws of 2007) and the disability impairs or prevents the tenant or the tenant’s representative from making a written request for storage, it must be presumed that the tenant has requested the storage of the property as provided in this section unless the tenant objects in writing”

Additionally if a tenant is suffering from severe mental crisis, “the detective would have had the King County Mental Health professionals out to evaluate her,” or if necessary, he would have had her involuntarily evaluated at Harborview, the spokesperson said.

Thanks to the King County Sheriff for providing more insight on the situation.

 

Capitol Hill startup Shelf Engine gets $800k seed to grow ‘highly perishable food’ AI

Anybody who has made a Capitol Hill coffee shop their office is probably familiar with neighborhood entrepreneur Stefan Kalb’s work. His Molly’s brand sandwiches and snacks are a ubiquitous part of the Seattle-area cafe scene. Another of his ventures just got a big financial vote of confidence:

Shelf Engine, a Seattle-based startup who uses artificial intelligence to help retailers and distributors order better to optimize for profits in highly perishable food categories, announced today a seed investment of $800k. The investment from Bay Area and Seattle funds is lead by Initialized Capital with participation by Founder’s Co-op, Liquid 2 Venture, and other angel investors enabling Shelf Engine to scale in 2017.

Kalb and co-founder Bede Jordan created Shelf Engine to help reduce waste in the Molly’s business, according to an announcement on the funding round. The startup’s office is on 12th Ave below Plum Bistro and La Spiga in the Piston Ring building.

“Most grocery stores leave ordering of fresh food up to individual category managers. But those managers typically lack appropriate tools and data needed to match orders of hundreds or thousands of products to demand,” CEO Kalb said in the announcement.

Shelf Engine’s order prediction engine analyzes historical order and sales data to generate automated order recommendations, according to the company.

Kalb has stepped down from his CEO role at Molly’s to focus on Shelf Engine, the Seattle Time reports. The news will also create a few new 12th Ave jobs. Much of the financing will go toward hiring developers.

You can learn more at shelfengine.com.

 

Capitol Hill Renter Initiative, Entre Hermanos holding ‘housing justice’ movie night

Last summer, CHS reported on progress in easing the construction of backyard rentals to help combat Seattle’s affordability crisis. The progress has since ground to a halt. Wednesday, the Capitol Hill Renter Initiative and Latino LGBTQ nonprofit Entre Hermanos are teaming up for a movie night and discussion at 12th Ave’s Northwest Film Forum to sort out how the groups “can take action on backyard cottages and other housing justice campaigns” —

Housing Justice Movie Night-Quinceañera

This event was created in response to the recent decision by the Seattle hearing examiner to indefinitely delay an ordinance that would make it easier for homeowners to build backyard cottages (legally called Detached Accessory Dwelling Units or DADUs) like the home the main characters share in the movie. The hearing examiner decision came after a legal challenge by the Queen Anne Community Council, a neighborhood group that hired attorneys in order to delay these low cost housing options from coming to their neighborhood.

You can register for a “ticket” to the event here. The screening is free but organizers are asking for a $3 donation to help cover costs.

CHS wrote here last month on the Capitol Hill Renter Initiative’s goals for 2017.