CHS Pics | Central District gets a parklet

IMG_8733Funded by the surrounding community, the 25th and Union parklet made its debut Sunday with a kid-powered ribbon cutting. The ceremony and gathering on the Ten Penny Studio-designed mini-park in front of Cortona Cafe was part of a busy weekend around the Central District including the first annual Central Area Block Party and a 100th anniversary celebration for 23rd and Yesler’s Douglass-Truth library.

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The new Central District public space joins a similar mini-park on E Olive Way that was the first parklet constructed in Seattle back in 2013. Planning remains in motion for a street park near 10th and Pike backed by the Comet and Lost Lake.

More images of the new parklet — organizers Amanda Bryan and Karen Estevenin wrote about it here — and all the Central District fun, below.

(Images: CHS)

(Images: CHS)

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Arboretum trail will give Central Seattle its very own Green Lake

Rendering of the future trail (Images: City of Seattle)

Rendering of the future trail (Images: City of Seattle)

Planners expect a center line to help split traffic on the trail's curves

Planners expect a center line to help split traffic on the trail’s curves

Following this winter’s rains, crews will begin work on a paved trail weaving in an out of the wetlands and gardens of the Arboretum allowing pedestrians a closer connection to the natural preserve and giving bike riders an alternative to busy Lake Washington Blvd.

“Seattleites love Green Lake… this is going to be a great alternative walk in a spectacular Seattle park,” said Paige Miller who works for the Arboretum Foundation and sits on the joint committee that is supervising the project.

The 1.2-mile loop will be 12-feet wide and paved perfect for slower traffic including joggers and strollers. Bicycle riders will be able to pedal through the Arboretum rather than brave the winding, motor vehicle-filled Lake Washington Blvd. Continue reading

Capitol Hill Park(ing) Day 2014 — UPDATE

The creator of the "Community Conversations" pop-up park on E Pike said she had an ulterior motive for participating in Park(ing) Day 2014 -- she's new in town and looking to make friends! Stop by! (Image: CHS)

The creator of the “Community Conversations” pop-up park on E Pike said she had an ulterior motive for participating in Park(ing) Day 2014 — she’s new in town and looking to make friends! Stop by! (Image: CHS)

The CHS newsmobile gets a tune-up on E Pike thanks to Bikeworks and Pronto (Image: CHS)

The CHS newsmobile gets a tune-up on E Pike thanks to Bikeworks and Pronto (Image: CHS)

UPDATE: Free bagels and books at one parklet, Couchfest movies at another on 12th Ave. Free conversations and bike tune-ups on E Pike. Free groovy soul on 10th Ave. CHS toured the Capitol Hill Park(ing) Day 2014 pop-up parks Friday afternoon and found a few sections of street filled with feet — and couches, turf, tables, chairs, plus plants. Arielle Lawson told CHS she’s new to the city and setting up a conversation-focused Park(ing) Day park in front of Cupcake Royale was part of her secret strategy to find new friends and get to know Capitol Hill. At the Pronto-sponsored park on E Pike in front of Caffe Vita, they weren’t letting anybody ride the bike share bike, yet, but you could sit and get your picture taken. On 10th Ave in front of the Odd Fellows building, they didn’t really care what you did as long as you climbed up on the pedestals. “Dance,” Marc McGuane invited a few visitors to his Soul Patch pop-up creation. What brought the designer to Capitol Hill to create his Park(ing) Day park? “I just wanted somewhere with some foot traffic,” he said. “And someplace they wouldn’t mind some music.”

Screen Shot 2014-09-18 at 8.15.31 PMPark(ing) Day was born in San Francisco. But the Seattle tradition of celebrating creative use of public streets with tiny “pop-up parks” got its start on Capitol Hill. This year in Seattle, Friday’s event will feature 50 or more of these pocket parks on the streets of neighborhoods across the city — including six on Capitol Hill and another on First Hill. Details on the parks and more, below. We’ll also be out and about on Friday to get a few pictures and notes from the day. Smile.

Harris in 2009 (Image: CHS)

Harris in 2009 (Image: CHS)

The first Seattle Park(ing) Day took place in 2009 along E Pine — off the street, it turns out.  Urban planner Keith Harris helped turn the People’s Parking Lot — a gravel-covered dirt parcel left empty as a developer waited to build the six-story building that stands there today — into the first home for the Seattle version of the event. There were some lean years in between with low participation but the event has grown into a much bigger deal in 2014. Continue reading

CHS Pics | Round and round Cal Anderson for first annual Red Door 5K

IMG_2457IMG_2507The first ever Red Door 5K Run/Walk to benefit Broadway at Union’s Gilda’s Club sent runners and walkers big and little around and around Cal Anderson on a sunny Seattle September Saturday.

CHS wrote about the new fundraiser and “red door” campaign to support the organization and Camp Sparkle, a day camp for kids 4-12 affected by cancer. On Saturday, some of that support was paid $5 at a time thanks to the Red Door 5k “shortcut” donation box.

In two weeks, one of the inspirations for Saturday’s Gilda’s Club event will add its start and finish lines once again to Volunteer Park as the annual Seattle AIDS Walk returns. You can learn more about the September 27th fundraiser and E Pike-based organizer Lifelong at seattleaidswalk.org. CHS is proud to once again be a community sponsor of the event.

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Be ready to enjoy the rare stink as Volunteer Park Conservatory’s corpse flower prepares to bloom

(Image: Friends of the Conservatory)

(Image: Friends of the Conservatory)

UPDATE: Bloom. The spokescat has spoken: one of Volunteer Park Conservatory’s corpse flowers is now in full bloom and reportedly it “stinks to high heaven!” The Conservatory — 1400 E Galer St — will keep long hours Friday, September 12th, staying open from 10 AM to 9 PM so as many admirers as possible can have a chance to see and smell the rare occurrence. Named Edward Allan Pew after a naming contest that ran the last few weeks came to a close earlier this week, the plant is the first titum arum to bloom at the Conservatory since 2008. As of June of this year, less than 160 corpse flower blooms were reported to have been documented worldwide since 1880.

A rarefied stench in the air? There is expected to be one any day now at the Volunteer Park Conservatory. Visitors over the next few weeks may have the chance to experience a rare botanical occurrence through multiple senses as one of the corpse flowers now on display at the Conservatory is blossoming and shooting upwards. The plant is expected to bloom and release an odor that has been described as “a cross between rotting flesh and Limburger cheese” within the next two weeks.

Corpse flowers typically require seven to ten years of vegetative growth before blooming for the first time. This will be the first time the particular plant has bloomed since arriving in Capitol Hill in 2006, the Seattle PI reported, and the fist time any corpse flower has bloomed at the Conservatory since 2008, the Friends of the Conservatory group said.

Though CHS is not casting a prediction on precisely when the plant will bloom, the Conservatory’s “official spokescat” Ivan Von Katzen offered this forecast in a Facebook post Thursday:

Corpse Flower Watch: Our new buddy is on display at the Conservatory in the Bromeliad House and it grew an inch overnight! It now reaches 31″ and is growing fast! We anticipate the flower will be in full fragrant bloom within the next two weeks.Come take a look at this rare wonder Tuesday- Saturday [*Sunday] from 10:00 am – 3:00 PM – 1400 East Galer Street, Seattle WA — at Volunteer Park Conservatory.

Once the plant blooms, the supporting structure of its flowers, or the “spathe,” will likely only stay open for about 12 hours before starting to wilt, sources indicate, though some corpse flower spathes have been reported to stay open for one or two whole days.Native to western Sumatra, the corpse flower is known as bunga bangkai (“corpse flower”) in Indonesian or by the Greek name Amorphophallus titanum, or more commonly titum arum. In addition to the particular odor it emits when blooming, the titum arum produces the largest non-branched “inflorescence,” or group of flowers, of any plant in the world. Friends of the Conservatory explains:

Once a blossom appears, the corpse flower grows rapidly and can reach a height of over 10-feet within the course of a few weeks.  It grows from a large tuber which can reach 150 pounds or more.

After its first bloom, the titum arum will typically bloom again after anywhere from another two to five years, to another seven to ten years, Friends of the Conservatory reported.

In addition to seeing one reaching bloom, you can also have a chance to win a 2-year-old titum arum of your own by coming up with a personal name for the blossoming corpse flower at the Conservatory. The “Name a Corpse Flower, Win a Corpse Flower” contest is on. Potential plant-namers can turn in their suggestions at the Conservatory, where entry forms are available at the gift shop, or via Twitter by sending their ideas to the spokescat — @Ivan_Von_Katzen.

The titum arum about to bloom at the Volunteer Park Conservatory was donated by the University of Washington Botany Greenhouse some eight years ago, the Seattle PI reported. It should soon be adding to a small pool of statistics: when a corpse flower bloomed at the conservatory in Como Park in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 2013, only about 125 corpse flower blooms were said to have been documented worldwide since 1880.

The stench of corpse flower blooms do serve a purpose beyond generating sensational blog posts. The smell of rotting flesh emitted attracts insects such as the carrion-eating beetles and “flesh flies” that pollinate the plant in its natural habitats. Meanwhile, the flowers’ red color and their texture are said to add to the illusion that they are pieces of meat.

Something to chew on maybe if you make it to the Conservatory to check out the events now unfolding.

UPDATE: It’s over. Another sink has come and gone!

Sunday, September 14 was the last day for our Titan arum to be on display. Edgar Allan PEW was well on the way to total collapse by the end of the day. Stay tuned in future years for the next big stink!

12th Ave community group votes for apartment development over city ‘pocket park’

Reverb-Spectrum-11th-And-AlderIn response to a condemnation order placed on a site owned by real estate firm Spectrum Development Solutions at 11th and Alder in order to build a new pocket park, the 12th Avenue Stewards community group has voted unanimously to rescind the order and allow the construction project to continue rather than begin design on a new public space.

Following the vote, Mayor Ed Murray officially withdrew the proposed condemnation order, representatives tell CHS.

“This issue is something that has been difficult for the group,” said Bill Zosel, vice-chair of the 12th Avenue Stewards told CHS in a statement on the vote. Continue reading

One last song from the piano in Volunteer Park

Monty Banks

Monty Banks

The pianos in the parks are gone, auctioned off to the highest bidders to support public open spaces in King County. In addition to inspiring musical spins around Capitol Hill’s green spaces, the Pianos in the Parks campaign has also inspired some excellent performances. A contest to capture some of the best from around the parks system has wrapped up — the winning video shot down on the waterfront is below. We’ve also included a finalist who chose the Volunteer Park piano for his plinking — check out the performance by Monty Banks after the jump. Continue reading

CHS Pics | First Hill scrabbles for park space — Next: Hopscotch CD returns

IMG_4175Public park space. Consultant. Release. Report. Blah blah blah. Let’s talk giant street Scrabble. Tuesday night, the tri-way intersection of University, Union, and Boylston hosted an oversized Scrabble tournament in the middle of the street smack in between Pike/Pine and First Hill.

Hopscotch CD returns

Hopscotch CD returns

The tournament designed to bring attention to First Hill’s lack of public spaces pitted four two-person teams head to head and attracted onlookers and plenty of second-guessing. City officials are hoping to hold future tournaments in other areas of Seattle in need of a creative though temporary mini-park. Maybe this dude from Portland will come.

For more gaming fun on the streets of Central Seattle, get ready for the second annual Hopscotch CD event on Saturday, August 23rd. The Jackson Commons community event creates 2.9 miles of hopscotch play areas across the Central District. Included in the fun, Centerstone’s parking lot at 722 18th Ave will host the grandmamma of all hopscotch games in an attempt to break a world record.

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First Hill initiative seeks to re-imagine ‘parks’ in dense neighborhoods

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 11.13.00 AMFirst Hill community representatives say the neighborhood is in desperate need of more public park space and for ten years Seattle Parks and Recreation has been trying to acquire land to build it. In 2000 and 2008 voters approved levies to fund land acquisitions for new parks on First Hill, but affordable properties are almost non-existant in one of the densest neighborhoods in the state.

Last year Parks reached out to the First Hill Improvement Association and the neighborhood’s burgeoning cadre of civically active residents to talk about alternatives. What the city came up with was the First Hill Public Realm Action Plan.

The plan gathers representatives from the city’s Department of Transportation, Department of Planning and Development, and Parks to explore using parks levy funds to carve out public space from the city’s existing assets — primarily streets, sidewalks, and parking. Continue reading

Murray declares ‘apparent’ victory in Seattle parks vote


Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 9.33.55 PMThursday’s final big count of August Primary ballots did nothing to change the outcome that was obvious after Election Night’s first tally. The majority of the city’s voters, supported the mayor’s Seattle Parks District plan to fund parks. Thursday night, Mayor Ed Murray’s office decided it was time to declare victory on the “apparent passage” of the proposition.

“I want to thank Seattle voters for their support of the parks district and commitment to creating a lasting legacy of open space and facilities for generations of Seattleites,” Murray says in the statement sent to media.

“This vote means a sustainable source of funding for our parks system. We will begin work immediately to address our existing maintenance backlog, working diligently to manage the needs of our park system as Seattle continues to grow as a city.”

The plan will give the to-be-formed district power to tax up to $0.75 per $1,000 of assessed property value to pay for the Seattle Parks system. Seattle City Council members who will make up the district board have said they do not plan to tax above $0.33 per $1,000 to fund the current parks budget.

Concierge — complete with patio furniture — comes to Cal Anderson as summer safety issues return

The timing makes it an even easier target. Wednesday, forest green chairs, tables, and umbrellas were added to the cement plaza between Cal Anderson’s community house and its notoriously filthy bathrooms. That night, another in a short string of park muggings and robberies went down during the park’s late night darkness.

But there’s more to the, um, punchline — the patio furniture belongs to the new Cal Anderson concierge, a new, short-term role that Seattle Parks and the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce hope might be made permanent with funding from the newly (mostly) approved Seattle Parks District.

Responsible for helping visitors to the park with information, setting out the tables and chairs — and bringing them in again at night — and putting out the park’s new giant chess pieces, the chamber’s director Michael Wells asked CHS readers to think of the new concierge simply as dedicated Cal Anderson staff. Parks tells us the concierge will be on hand seven days a week from noon to 7 PM through mid-September. The new role might not seem like enough to quell the nighttime problems that seem to come to a head every August in the park — and it’s probably not. Seattle Parks also continues to deploy its non-SPD park rangers in Cal Anderson and in other parks through the city but their hours are limited to daytime hours. The rangers can’t make the park 100% safe, either. Continue reading

August 2014 Primary Election: First count shows Seattle Parks District headed to win

Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 8.15.38 PMTuesday’s first tally of votes in the August primary showed the Mayor Ed Murray-championed Seattle Parks District on its way to probable victory. The plan, which will give the to-be-formed district power to tax up to $0.75 per $1,000 of assessed property value to pay for the Seattle Parks system, came in with 52.4% in favor of the proposition in the Election Night count. To pass, the “for” vote on the proposition needs a basic 50% or greater majority.

If her early primary results are any indication, Socialist Alternative candidate Jess Spear will have an uphill climb in her battle against incumbent Frank Chopp to represent Capitol Hill and the 43rd District in Olympia. With her quest for rent control and affordability, expect the massive gap to become somewhat less massive in coming counts. However, it would take a miracle for the challenger to come out on top in this one. In 2012, by the way, current City Council member Kshama Sawant switched races after the August primary to set her sights on Chopp on that year’s November ballot. Tuesday night, Spear organizers announced a “Renters Rise Up” campaign to fight for affordability in the city.

Meanwhile, the other incumbents on Capitol Hill ballots either ran mostly unopposed — or found their biggest challenger in perennial candidate GoodSpaceGuy.

You can view these and future updates on the King County Elections site.

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CHS Pics | Vibrations adds wild knot to string of Capitol Hill summer 2014 music fests

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Midday Veil (Images: Alex Garland for CHS)

IMG_9978Weird and totally DIY, Vibrations Festival brought music and art to the Volunteer Park amphitheater Sunday afternoon and into the evening.

Art projects and light projections joined “Choose Your Own Adventure”-style  installations as bands and DJs took the stage to continue the run of the annual celebration of Capitol Hill culture that got its start back in 2011.

Acts Gazebos, netcat, Wimps, USF, Stickers, DJAO, Midday Veil, and Naomi Punk took the stage.

You can see the roster of participating musicians, DJs, and artists here.

The 2014 edition of the festival from music, art, and fashion concern Cairo pushed forward without a major corporate sponsor with help from a small army of support and lots of blood, sweat, and tears from dedicated producers:

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