‘High tech dog houses’ where you can park your pup coming to Capitol Hill

(Image: DogSpot)

For the first time in 50 years, Seattle has more than 100,000 children. But we all know there are way more fur babies on Capitol Hill.

If it comes to being the most dog-friendly city in the US, Seattle is top dog. That’s according to real estate broker Redfin and Rover, the Uber for dog sitters and walkers. The companies compiled a list of cities with the highest amounts of dog walkers, sitters and walks, and combined the data with the amount of home sale listings that mention “dog”. Both Seattle-based companies announced that their hometown was the number 1 dog-friendly city. Chicago and Denver came in second and third.

Brooklyn-based company DogSpot has come to the same conclusion: People in Seattle love dogs (and walking them). Next month, the company will install six high tech dog houses — to leave Fido in while shopping — in the Seattle area, including on the Hill, in a partnership with supermarket chain QFC.

“Seattle’s a tech-friendly and dog-obsessed city,” says Rebecca Eyre, director of communications at DogSpot. “Those things make it an amazing market for us.” Continue reading

Halloween Pet Parade in Volunteer Park

Join us for a festive celebration of our furry friends!  This delightful parade will feature pets in costumes, food trucks, prizes, and 20 vendor booths.

Click here to register your pet!

Like, share and RSVP on our Facebook event page.

Food Trucks

The following food trucks will be on hand for a little snack!

Nonprofits

The following nonprofit groups will also be on hand:

Dirtie Dog Photography will be offering FREE digital photos of your pets!

And more!  See our website event page for updated info.

Volunteer!

We need volunteers to help make this fun event a success – see our call for volunteers on Facebook or just sign up here!

THANK YOU!

Thank you to our Event Sponsors: Aegis Living on Madison and Jet City Animal Clinic.

Thank you to our sponsoring Community Partners:  Kaiser Permanente and 4Culture.

 

7th annual Leschi Art Walk


7th ANNUAL LESCHI ART WALK ; Celebrating Creativity and Community
SEPTEMBER 08, 2018 11AM-4PM
Leschi neighborhood on Lake Washington, street-side between
103 and 200 Lakeside Avenue and in Leschi Park in Seattle.
The Leschi Business Association and Leschi Community Council are proud to present local artists, craftspersons and businesses at the 7TH Annual Art Walk. Participating artists include photography, painting and graphics, jewelry, glasswork, and ceramics. There will also be local community groups represented.
In addition to the arts and crafts booths there will be children’s activities and a live music stage with 3 bands. New this year will be a creative dance class for kids in the park and a neighborhood dog tricks and costume contest.
THIS EVENT IS FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Rethinking the Capitol Hill Pac-Man pavement park

Kim’s picture of the Pac-man pocket park from the Capitol Hill Seattle Facebook Group

The latest discussion in the Capitol Hill Seattle Facebook Group brings together many themes familiar to readers of CHS — public space, parks and p-patches, homelessness… and dogs.

Kim posted this image of the E Olive Way at Summit at Denny Pac-Man pocket park and raises a valid issue — what use is a pocket park if nobody uses it? “I pass this sad scene every day and have never seen anything suggestive of added value going on there,” she writes. “Would make a great pea patch or dog park with a little investment.” Continue reading

Downtown Dog Lounge leaving Capitol Hill

Just as the plans for Capitol Hill’s first cat cafe are finally taking shape, one of its longest running canine-focused businesses is getting ready to move out.

The Downtown Dog Lounge has been getting its furry clients ready for the big change on E Denny Way for a while now but officially announced its planned departure this week after 10 years on Capitol Hill: Continue reading

Advocate group looks for Capitol Hill support for more off-leash dog parks

(Image: City of Seattle)

(Image: City of Seattle)

The forecast this week calls for the dog days of summer, but dogs in Seattle don’t have many options for relief from the heat.

Dogs are only allowed to swim at Magnuson Park, which has 145 feet of shoreline.

Citizens for Off-Leash Areas, or COLA, wants to change that. The group wants more waterfront parks open to dogs and more off-leash options in general that are within walking distance of every dog owner. Organizers see it as much more than an issue of play and lakeside fun. COLA reps say resources for dog owners are a social justice issue in a city supposedly tackling equity issues across its neighborhoods. Meanwhile, Seattle’s population is set to soar to 750,000 by 2020. About one out of three of the new residents will bring dogs. Continue reading

Eastlake seeks ideas to make the I-5 Colonnade weirder and more useful

Fremont may have Seattle’s most well known bridge underpass, but Eastlake’s Colonnade Open Space under I-5 is more useful, impressive, and even weirder than hordes of tourists crawling over a troll.

Opened in 2005, the Colonnade is now in need of some work and the Eastlake Community Council wants input on how the park should be improved and expanded. An introductory public meeting on the project will be held Thursday night at 6:30 PM at the Agora Conference Center.

Located under I-5 along Lakeview Blvd. E, the Colonnade includes an off-leash dog park, pedestrian walkways, and an award winning mountain bike park. The Eastlake Community Council, which was responsible for obtaining the initial funds to open the space in 2005, has already kicked around some ideas for improvements to the park:

  • Adding new paths and sidewalks to improve access through the park.
  • Adding a skate bowl and ramps
  • Improved trail surfacing and bike themed art
  • An agility course for dogs with “paw-friendly” surfacing and dog themed art
(Image: City of Seattle)

(Image: City of Seattle)

Improving pedestrian and bike connections from the park to Capitol Hill was also cited as part of a study completed by the community council in 2012.

At its south end, the study suggests that Colonnade park needs a stairway up to Lakeview Blvd., a trail south to the intersection of Eastlake Ave. and E. Aloha Street, and a trail southwest to the intersection of Franklin Ave. E. and E. Galer St. It also suggests that on the WSDOT land between E. Galer and E. Nelson streets that connects Colonnade with Eastlake Avenue, there could be steps and a switchback trail, and in the sunny upper elevation above the trees, possibly P-Patch plots to address the citywide shortage.

To learn more about the project and how to get involved, visit eastlakeseattle.org